2021 May Elections

PLEASE NOTE: THIS PAGE WILL BE REGULARLY UPDATED WITH THE LATEST INFORMATION SO PLEASE REFER BACK TO THIS PAGE ON A REGULAR BASIS IN THE LEAD UP TO THE ELECTIONS.

On 6 May 2021, local polls will take place, including local elections in England and Police and Crime Commissioner elections in England and Wales. The Government have published details about how they will proceed with the Elections in the COVID-19 context including announcement through to declaring the results. The document covers the four major areas:

  • public health and social distancing
  • nominations and campaigning
  • voting
  • the delivery of elections

A copy of the document can be downloaded from the Government website:

May 2021 Poll Delivery Plan

Shropshire Council has a dedicated information page for the 2021 elections which can be accessed via the link below:

https://www.shropshire.gov.uk/elections-and-electoral-registration/voting-and-elections/town-and-parish-elections-6-may-2021/

Nomination papers can be:

  • Downloaded from the Electoral Commission’s website
  • Provided by the Clerk – Please note that town / parish clerks will have paper copies of the nomination packs available towards the end of February; or
  • Provided by Electoral Services at Shropshire Council. Send an email to elections@shropshire.gov.uk providing your name, address and the area you wish to stand in. Please note that despatch of nomination packs is expected to commence mid- to late-February.

MAKE A CHANGE – BECOME A COUNCILLOR

Are you passionate about your community? Do you want to help make a long-lasting change? Do you have innovative ideas for the council? Do you have concerns about a specific issue and want to do something about it? If this is you, then we need you. We need people from all backgrounds and experiences who reflect their community to put themselves forward for election. Make a change and become a councillor.

Here, you will find everything you need to know. We explain what local councils and councillors do, how you can become a councillor, details of the role and what to expect.

WHAT DO LOCAL COUNCILS AND COUNCILLORS DO?

Local (parish and town) councils and councillors make a massive difference to the quality of life of local people. They are passionate about their communities and seek to make a change to help improve the lives of their residents.

You can find out ore about Whittington Parish Council on the ‘About Whittington Parish Council’ Page.

Councillors are elected to represent the local community, so you must either live or work in the council area (see below for more details on eligability). Becoming a councillor is a rewarding experience as you will be in a position to make a change in your community to help improve the lives of residents. A councillor’s role can include responsibilities such as developing strategies and plans for the area, helping with problems and ideas, representing the community, working with other local community groups, decision making and reviewing decisions and talking to the community about their needs and about what the council is doing.

HOW TO BECOME A COUNCILLOR?

Local councils can only be as useful, connected and energetic as the people elected to run it, so we need councillors who are capable, enthusiastic and engaged to reflect their communities. You can find out more about becoming a councillor on The Electoral Commission and Local Government Association website.

Local elections are taking place on the 6th May 2021.

The Notice of Elections will be published in March and this begins the pre-election or ‘purdah’ period. More details to follow shortly , including how to nominate yourself as a condidate.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR STANDING FOR ELECTION

To be able to stand as a candidate at a parish council election in England or a community council election in Wales you must:

• be at least 18 years old

• be a British citizen, an eligible Commonwealth citizen or a citizen of any member state of the European Union, and

• meet at least one of the following four qualifications:

a. You are, and will continue to be, registered as a local government elector for the parish/community in which you wish to stand from the day of your nomination onwards.

b. You have occupied as owner or tenant any land or other premises in the parish/community area during the whole of the 12 months before the day of your nomination and the day of election.

c. Your main or only place of work during the 12 months prior to the day of your nomination and the day of election has been in the parish/community area.

d. You have lived in the parish/community area or within three miles of it during the whole of the 12 months before the day of your nomination and the day of election. See paragraph 1.20 for further details.

Disqualifications

Apart from meeting the qualifications for standing for election, you must also not be disqualified.

There are certain people who are disqualified from being elected to a parish or community council in England and Wales. You cannot be a candidate if at the time of your nomination and on polling day:

a. You are employed by the parish/community council or hold a paid office under the parish/community council (including joint boards or committees).

b. You are the subject of a bankruptcy restrictions order or interim order.

c. You have been sentenced to a term of imprisonment of three months or more (including a suspended sentence), without the option of a fine, during the five years before polling day.

d. You have been disqualified under the Representation of the People Act 1983 (which covers corrupt or illegal electoral practices and offences relating to donations). The disqualification for an illegal practice begins from the date the person has been reported guilty by an election court or convicted and lasts for three years. The disqualification for a corrupt practice begins from the date a person has been reported guilty by an election court or convicted and lasts for five years.

A person may also be disqualified from election if they have been disqualified from standing for election to a local authority following a decision of the First-tier Tribunal (formerly the Adjudication Panel for England) or the Adjudication Panel for Wales.

Shropshire Association of Local Councils invites you to join us at this free open
discussion event:

6.30 ON FRIDAY 12 MARCH 2021 via ZOOM

You will have the opportunity to ask our Panel about local councils, what they
do, the role of a councillor and how to become one.


Meet viral sensation, Jackie Weaver, Chief Officer at the Cheshire Association
of Local Councils and a group of community heroes to discuss getting involved
with your local (parish and town) council.


Speakers: Cllrs Gwilym Butler, Shropshire Council, Dan Harman, Bomere Heath
Parish Council, Dan Thomas, Town Mayor of Much Wenlock Town Council,
Helen Ball Town Clerk, Shrewsbury Town Council and Justin Griggs, Head of
Policy and the National Association of Local Councils.

To join, please book your place by visiting:
https://www.alcshropshire.co.uk/events/2021/03/12/make-change-become-
councillor

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